Nashville Limo Blog

Learn More About Nashville and Grand Avenue

Learn More

I Left My Heart (and cocktail) in San Francisco

Posted on: May 20th, 2016 by grandave No Comments

I Left My Heart (and cocktail) in San Francisco

When United Airlines and the Metro Nashville Airport Authority announced a nonstop flight to San Francisco, they opened the press conference at Nashville International Airport with a trio of Victorian era carolers who sang “I Left My Heart in San Francisco”. The announcement was applauded by a large (very happy) group, led by Nashville Mayor Megan Barry.

This follows a string of recently announced new nonstop service from Nashville International Airport including Boston, Fort Lauderdale, Seattle, Oakland and Indianapolis. BNA is currently served by 10 airlines and offers 390 daily flights. Nashville International Airport provides nonstop air service to more than 50 destinations.

The 5h 5m daily flight to SFO began on May 5, 2016. This is Nashville’s only nonstop flight to the Golden Gate City. In 2011, SFO was the 8th busiest airport in the U.S. and 22nd busiest in the world, handling over 40.9 million passengers. I’d be curious to know what that number is today.

San Francisco is known for many things — its cool summers, fog, steep rolling hills, eclectic mix of architecture, and landmarks, including the Golden Gate Bridgecable cars, the former Alcatraz Federal PenitentiaryFisherman’s Wharf, and its Chinatown district.

One thing not listed on The City by the Bay’s Wikipedia page is their famous cocktail scene. See below for a list of 10 of hottest spots according to cocktail expert, Camper English.

 The Bar Report: San Francisco

By Camper English, August 5, 2015 -DEPARTURES

San Francisco’s greatest cocktail bars, from the classics that keep us coming back to the brand new spots we find most impressive.

Long at the cutting edge of the craft cocktail renaissance, San Francisco’s beverage scene has now settled into a comfortable middle-age in which every new bar and restaurant hosts a quality drink list. Because the average cocktail program is of such high caliber, it’s hard for the visitor to know which members of the old guard are as exciting as ever, and which new venues are worth making a trip to visit. Enter our cocktail expert (and San Francisco native) Camper English: Here, he highlights the top five longstanding cocktail spots in the city, as well as the most promising new additions to the landscape.

NOPA

The massive, bar-centric restaurant NOPA has been doing cocktails so right for so long it’s fallen off the media’s radar; but as the throngs of patrons prove, locals still line up for their unique creations. Always ahead of the trend, the bar championed once-esoteric ingredients like shrub syrups, sherry, and vermouth-based cocktails long before the cocktail cognoscenti widely adopted them, and began emphasizing low-proof, food-friendly drinks on their menus while other bars were still promoting boozy “brown, bitter, and stirred” classics. Drinks here can be a touch obscure for the budding cocktail enthusiast but the bartenders are there to guide you toward options that suit your mood. The former bank building features an impressively long bar where many patrons choose to dine with their drinks; it’s especially delightful to grab a seat here for brunch, when the sun streams through the massive wall of windows. 560 Divisadero St.; 415-864-8643; nopasf.com.

 NOPA San Francisco

@Alanna Hale – NOPA

Bar Agricole

Fine dining meets farm-to-glass at Agricole, where the world’s most meticulous recipe and ingredient sourcing is par for the course. Take, for example, the House Old Fashioned—what you’d assume to be a simple drink. Based on a private-barrel cognac procured in France by the bartenders on a research trip, the drink is made of a dry rye gin plus a spoonful each of a locally made gomme syrup and a maraschino liqueur developed in partnership with the bar owner; two different housemade bitters, which take up to two months to infuse; served over hand-cut ice in a delicate tempered Japanese glass. Each cocktail on the list is given this much attention, and everything Bar Agricole does is utterly deserving of yours. 355 11th St.; 415-355-9400; baragricole.com.

Comstock Saloon

The most popular order off Comstock’s short-and-simple drink menu isn’t a cocktail at all, but rather the option to let the bartender create something à la minute. Order the Barkeep’s Whimsy and specify something bourbon-based and effervescent, for example, and the bartender might recreate a classic or invent something totally original. Bars around the country have adopted this system, but that no place does it as well as Comstock. The bar’s two rooms have restored or recreated accents from the 1907 building (built, as most things in this part of town, after the Great Quake of 1906), including the tile floors, horizontal chain-pulled ceiling fans, and under-bar spittoon trough that is, thankfully, not in active use. Don’t pass up the Barbary Coast-era fare (pot pie, oysters, chicken livers, and the like), and cross your fingers that your visit coincides with the live, old-timey music performed from the tiny balcony. 155 Columbus Ave.; 415-617-0071; comstocksaloon.com.

Trick Dog

A remarkable balancing act between quality, speed, and fun, Trick Dog remains a destination cocktail bar that—despite its location slightly off the beaten path in the Mission District—is (nearly) always busy. Its menus, which change twice annually, are a thing of legend: once the drinks were listed on an album’s inner record label, another time on a Pantone color strips; and a third in the style of a Chinese restaurant menu, complete with pictures and numbered cocktail names. Drinks contain tiny amounts of exotic ingredients like balsam fir, raisin liqueur, and walnut-infused Fernet Branca. With the bustling crowds and remarkably speedy bartenders, drinkers usually breeze into Trick Dog for a few quick cocktails then head elsewhere: Thanks to the great service, it’s a quick visit but one that always leaves a lasting impression. 3010 20th St.; 415-471-2999; trickdogbar.com.

Smuggler’s Cove

This three-level, but ultimately tiny, tiki bar will forever stand in the shadow of the magnificently grandTonga Room at the Fairmont Hotel, but the opposite can be said of the cocktails. The roughly 80 drinks on the list are constructed by several of the world’s best bartenders (objectively speaking), who throw together rounds of eight-ingredient cocktails like they’re mixing vodka sodas. Accordingly, Smuggler’s Cove is the only San Francisco establishment consistently placed on the World’s 50 Best Bars list. Waits can be long and no reservations are accepted, so the regulars here know to arrive early and, importantly, to eat first: The rum is strong and the drinks are so good, it’s hard to get your sea legs once you’ve found reason to leave. 650 Gough St.; 415-869-1900; smugglerscovesf.com.

 Smugglers Cove San Francisco

@Allison Webber – Smuggler’s Cove

Dirty Habit

Despite its slightly unappetizing name, Dirty Habit—located at the site of the former Fifth Floor restaurant in the Hotel Zelos—serves up some of the city’s most impressive cocktails and cocktail-friendly food. The multi-environment space includes several lounge and restaurant areas, barstools, and an outdoor patio—parts of which are often cordoned off for private cocktail parties. The drink list is one of the longest in San Francisco and emphasizes fresh ingredients like rhubarb, pear juice, baked apples, and carrots, so let seasonality be your guide. There is a short list of shareable beverages, too, which are ideal for small groups at happy hour. 12 Fourth St.; 415-348-1555; dirtyhabitsf.com.

Dirty Habit

Despite its slightly unappetizing name, Dirty Habit—located at the site of the former Fifth Floor restaurant in the Hotel Zelos—serves up some of the city’s most impressive cocktails and cocktail-friendly food. The multi-environment space includes several lounge and restaurant areas, barstools, and an outdoor patio—parts of which are often cordoned off for private cocktail parties. The drink list is one of the longest in San Francisco and emphasizes fresh ingredients like rhubarb, pear juice, baked apples, and carrots, so let seasonality be your guide. There is a short list of shareable beverages, too, which are ideal for small groups at happy hour. 12 Fourth St.; 415-348-1555; dirtyhabitsf.com.

 Pabu

A decadently huge, modern Japanese izakaya by chef Ken Tominaga in partnership with Michael Mina (whose namesake restaurant is located across the street), Pabu has quickly become one of the most grand and exciting dining and drinking spots in the city. The cocktails, available at the large square atrium-enclosed bar or while dining, reflect the restaurant’s philosophy of refined subtle simplicity: a drink may contain gin, citrus, and lavender-wasabi salt, and come served with hand-cut ice with flowers frozen inside. Japanese ingredients including yuzu, tea, and sake are featured, and the Japanese whisky selection is one of the best in town—if not the country. 101 California St.; 415-668-7228;pabuizakaya.com.

Dirty Water

Situated within the large atrium inside the Twitter building on Market Street, Dirty Water (apparently San Francisco really has an issue with naming its bars), opened as an all-purpose, all-day bar-cum-restaurant last year. The food program now includes brunch, a late night menu, and a more expanded lunch menu, and the roomy lounge area is equipped with over 100 wines by the glass and more than 50 beers on tap. The cocktail menu lists thirteen classic and original drinks but a wide range of additional offerings are listed on an iPad, along with the complete wine and beer lists. Early stand-outs include the earthy Long Strange Trip cocktail with candy cap mushroom–infused rye whiskey, as well as The Bank Exchange with its combination of pisco and ginger beer. 1355 Market St.; 888-393-0530; dirtywatersf.com.

ABV

In the guise of an easygoing, friendly Mission neighborhood watering hole, this bar runs one of the tightest ships in town. All of the bartenders at ABV work a shift on the floor each week, so everyone on staff is able to expertly guide patrons through the exotic-sounding cocktails on the drink list, organized by base spirit. Strongly flavored, high-proof cocktails are the specialty of the house (the name is the acronym for “alcohol by volume”), but those seeking a little less kick can opt for the bucket-sized Michelada, or the rose wine on tap. With probably the best (and speediest) bar food in town (the quarter-pound pimento cheese burger is a particular favorite) there are plenty of alcohol-absorbing bites to keep you steady while you work your way through the cocktails. 3174 16th St.; 415-400-4748; abvsf.com.

http://www.departures.com/travel/best-bars-in-san-francisco-classic-spots-and-new-places-to-drink/13

Share
Nashville Airport Limo Executive Travel sedan limo industry nashville limo service limousine Carl Haley Nashville Limousine Service chauffeured transportation Country Music middle tennessee limousine industry transportation service tennessee titans nashville airport transportation travel wedding My It City nashville limo Nashville nashville tours The It City nashville airport airport Grande Avenue Global Events motor coach Grand Avenue prom tn safety tennessee Events It City united states airplane fleet nashville wedding limo Transportation airport limo Airport Limousine Service nashville bus rental business travel Corporate Travel chauffeur drive Music City limo pink bride suv


Categories



Archive